Cryptocurrency

Eleanor Terrett on impersonators and a better crypto industry: Hall of Flame

Fox Business producer Eleanor Terrett says that, as she gains more recognition in the crypto community, she is becoming a prime target for social media impersonators.

“So, I find myself having to tweet more often, saying, ‘Just a reminder, guys, I don’t have a private profile; I will never reach out to you,’” Terrett tells Magazine.

However, she warns that if you’re on the hunt for the next runaway altcoin, it’s probably not going to be her who finds it for you.

“I don’t have stock trading tips or crypto trading tips,” Terrett declares.

It’s a pity she can’t say the same for all those impersonators floating around out there: “They’re scamming people as well. There is one called Eleanor Terrett Private. They are inboxing people, saying, ‘Subscribe to my trading strategy.’”

What shocked Terrett even more is that some of these followers have “three, four and five thousand followers.”

While it might feel kind of nice, she’s genuinely curious about how these impostors manage to amass such a following pretending to be her.

Terrett has amassed over 90,000 followers through her consistent commentary on the Ripple v. SEC lawsuit.

Her fanbase is ballooning so fast that people are blowing up her DMs for paid sponsorships, just like those fancy influencers. 

But, for the moment, she’s not really vibing with the idea.

“I don’t want to promote anything at the moment; I have an employer, and, just right now, it’s just not for me. Maybe one day down the line, I don’t know. Maybe I’ll move jobs, or I’ll take up something else in the crypto space.”

However, she openly acknowledges that she receives heaps of requests to “partner up.”

When Terrett isn’t busy with her day job at Fox Business as a journalist and producer for Charlie Gasparino or seeking out the freshest crypto scoops for her followers, she enjoys giving back by spending time with animals.

“I volunteer at an animal shelter on the weekends because I just love animals, and I think they’re better than people.”

Yet a “definite career highlight” for her is receiving a cheeky follow from none other than Changpeng “CZ” Zhao, the CEO of Binance.

Furthermore, he gave her a shoutout and praised her social media commentary. Terrett explains that she cleared up a misconception for her Twitter (now X) followers: “[I further tweeted that] CZ doesn’t have to show up in person [for his court appearance]. He’s not going to be coming to the U.S. to testify. And I think he retweeted me and said, Eleanor’s got it right!”

However, she’s still keeping her fingers crossed for a follow from Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong.

What led to Twitter fame?

Terrett says she only had a handful of Twitter followers before venturing into the world of crypto.

“I really credit my follower growth to crypto because now I’m over 90,000, which is mind-blowing to me. I look at it every day, and I’m like, ‘That is crazy.’”

She says it all began when pro-XRP lawyer John Deaton tagged Charlie Gasparino in a tweet, nine months after the SEC filed its lawsuit against Ripple. 

Deaton urged him to take a peek at the Ripple v. SEC case. Deaton dubbed it the “biggest financial story of the century.”

Terrett explains that it was her job to really dig into the case, and that’s what got her hooked.

“It was a rundown of the Ripple case, how it came to be, the timeline, and all the key players involved,” she says.

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Terrett had no idea that her ongoing updates on the SEC v. Ripple case would eventually catapult her into the spotlight within the crypto industry.

“The lawsuit really got me interested in the whole space in the first place. And obviously, Ripple comes with the XRP community following, so that is sort of intertwined,” she explains.

Terrett explains that her increase in followers is simply the result of gradually building trust over time:

“I like to be reliable and trustworthy. So, it’s a cool cycle. I do good, and then people follow me. Crypto has been the catalyst for my followers, for sure.”

What content can people expect?

Terrett likes to focus on the legal and regulatory side of crypto and admits she isn’t really a “price analyst person.”

She declares that she keeps a vigilant eye on any new regulatory developments in the crypto world:

“So, for me, it’s mostly regulation and policy. So, anything that’s coming out of Washington to do with crypto, whether it’s the SEC, CFTC, the bills going on in Congress, it’s all very much from a policy standpoint.”

What do you enjoy on Twitter?

Terrett’s passion for crypto regulations means she enjoys keeping tabs on all the big shots in the U.S. government to ensure she doesn’t miss any juicy updates on what’s happening:

“So, it’s the Tom Emmers, the Bill Huizengas, Warren Davidsons — people who, if they’re gonna break news, they’ll probably break it on Twitter, right?”

She’s also got all the crypto exchange CEOs on her Twitter radar, making sure she doesn’t miss any hot gossip to share with her followers.

Predictions?

Terrett refrains from declaring any price predictions on crypto. However, you might catch an indirect hint of excitement about a crypto asset every now and then.

The day after Ripple scored a partial win against the SEC, she spilled the beans that a crypto exchange had a little hiccup, likely because of a crazy rush of people trying to buy XRP.

However, after diving headfirst into nearly every crypto-related court filing this year, she’s made some predictions about the industry for the next 12 months:

“I think the SEC has got a little bit of egg on its face in terms of its recent losses with crypto enforcement cases.”

Just like how taking baby steps can lead to success, Terrett firmly believes that all these little crypto victories, like Ripple’s recent victory, will stack up over time, creating a path to a more transparent industry.

She particularly notes the recent Uniswap class action lawsuit being thrown out as a good step forward for the industry:

“The judge said you can’t blame software for your losses. That was sort of a landmark case in that sense. That is basically what DeFi is, right? It’s software.”

Ciaran Lyons

Ciaran Lyons is an Australian crypto journalist. He’s also a standup comedian and has been a radio and TV presenter on Triple J, SBS and The Project.

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